Hygiene Combats Corona Virus

AB 5 is Wrong – Uber and Lyft are Right

Friends, we should spend our time fighting battles that need to be fought, not making a fuss over problems that aren’t really problems.

California enacted AB5 at the beginning of this year.  Basically, this new law would make it impossible for anyone to be considered a 1099 employee (independent contractor) in the State.  To get this done, California has put together a new test of the relationship between a company and a person to determine if they the person should be considerd an employee or not. Let’s skip, quickly, to California’s answer to this test – NOT.

California, you’ve got too much time on your hands.  Seriously, you should consider getting a job driving for Uber or Lyft in your spare time.  You would, at least, be doing something that would be truly helpful for your constituents.  Uber and Lyft provide a very, very valuable service.  Please, let’s not mess with something that is working this well.

The existing independent contractor law has been up and running for decades.  When a person (or class of people) is misclassified as an independent contractor, the existing regulatory agencies and the courts step in to right things. It isn’t a perfect system, but in general, it is working. There is nothing really broken that can’t be properly redressed with existing law on the books.

Uber and Lyft employees are the very definition of independent contractors (1099 employees).  They set their own start and end times.  They decide when they are available.  They buy and bring their own equipment.  They choose the routes they take.

Uber and Lyft merely provide them with customers.  At best, it is a referral/marketing agreement. Uber and Lyft provide referrals and get paid for doing that.

The result – drivers are making the extra money that they need.  Additionally, for those old enough to remember having to wait long periods of time to get a cab, then riding in the back of a dirty vehicle, often in questionable mechanic condition, driven by a smoker, who blasted the radio, while talking on their cell phone, driving too fast and precariously weaving in and out of traffic, you will know that Uber and Lyft have raised competitive standards in the industry.

Word on the street is that there is even a movement to bring AB5 to federal statutes.

Let’s not do that friends, please.  With Covid-19, we have got enough to keep us busy.  We don’t need another big, government caused mess.  Stop and think through the real ramifications to passing a law like this.  Honestly, it is earth shattering.

Just so you know, I consider myself a fiscal conservative and a liberal.  I want a progressive government that does smart things, efficiently and effectively.  Trust me, government has a long, long way to go to fix what it already has on the books. Let’s please not add to the crushing amount of legislation, poorly regulated and enforced, we currently have.

Instead, let’s spend our time and effort ensuring equal representation and fair treatment for all those who reside in the US, without regard to color, race, creed, national origin, etc. Let’s deal with the major issues first California.

 

 

 

 

 

What is outplacement answered by one of the best outplacement companies in the USA!

It may seem immodest to for an outplacement agency to name itself as one of the best outplacement companies in the USA.  It isn’t really because we work really hard to truly help those in career transition.  We actually care about those using our outplacement services and go out of our way to help.  We don’t have “office hours”.  Clients don’t have to make “appointments” with us.  We don’t limit the length of our services (we stay with the person in outplacement until after they’ve found their new job). We are there when there is a need – at 3am if that is when they need to talk.  Helping those using our outplacement services both find a job and find support during the process is our mission and passion.

In this time of the Covid-19 pandemic, we believe it is important to really understand “What is outplacement?”  Simply put, outplacement is:

  • A sign that a company values the people that work for it; that the company takes the practice of “corporate responsibility” seriously;
  • A way to show clients, remaining employees and others that you are doing your best to help ex-employee with outplacement services; reducing negative employee morale hits and negative customer reaction;
  • A way to show the exiting employee that you want to help; reducing negative feelings toward you, the chance of litigation, poor social media reviews;
  • A way to help those in outplacement find a new position much more quickly than would normally be possible without outplacement assistance;
  • A way to ensure that those utilizing outplacement services are truly being helped;
  • A way to provide needed career assessment, resume writing, job search strategy, interview training and a wide range of other related services.

Outplacement is the tangible way a company proves it cares.  The good news is that outplacement is very inexpensive.  Most people are surprised at how affordable it is.  When you factor in that people in outplacement normally get back to work much faster than those not provided outplacement services, and the money you save on unemployment taxes, lawyer fees, employee turnover, etc., the ROI of outplacement is very positive.

Again, due to Covid-19, we’ve made a commitment to use video conference technology (Skype, Zoom, etc.) to meet with those in our outplacement services.  We still want to connect.  Surprisingly, we’ve found that this is very, very effective (saves the person in outplacement a lot of time) and feels very “real” to all concerned.  We’ve always been a “high touch” company – now we are using Zoom, Skype, etc. to make those touches.  We have decided to continue you this when the Covid-19 pandemic ends.  This is a wonderful way to help people.

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Outplacement services open the door to future career opportunities.

We’d be excited to talk to you about your outplacement needs.  Please do call Rick at 309.310.5982 to find out how we can help.

Outplacement services as part of the organizational design process.

Employee Retention is Better than Recruiting 2019

Employee retention is THE key to organizational success today. While a solid overall talent management strategy will include improved recruiting processes, employee recognition, employee training, supervisory training, outplacement services and many other activities, real talent growth starts when a company implements effective employee retention processes.

Many people stress over the tight labor market … and it IS tight.

If you spend a bit more time focusing on how to make the work experience in your organization so welcoming and fulfilling that folks won’t consider leaving you, you will get several big benefits – employee retention and improved production, quality, attendance, creativity, etc.

There are lots of ways to improve your employee retention. It’s time to really to Walk A Mile In Your Employee’s Shoes. A good retention plan starts with a good design – everything from how you recruit, onboarding, train, supervise to how you provide outplacement services for those no longer needed.

Start today … better employee retention is less expensive and stressful than the alternative … you won’t regret it!!!!

PS Employee retention really is neither difficult, nor expensive. To improve your employee retention results all you need is focus and commitment. Once you understand that employee retention has as much value as shipping and receiving, for example, and act accordingly on a daily basis, you will be surprised at how quickly things can turn around. Having said that, there are no “quick fixes” in employee retention – while you will see fast improvements initially in your efforts, unless you truly commit to doing those things that help your employees know that you think THEY are important, you’ll find your long-term employee retention results disappointing.

I recommend that you start your employee retention improvement efforts by doing a “reward audit”. You need to ask your employees how they feel recognized and rewarded for doing their jobs. Most companies are shocked by the paucity of answers they get back. This is where to start … good luck!

Rick Galbreath

309.664.7741

www.outplacementcompany.net

Please also visit our sister site at www.performtogrow.com

#business #leadership #management #leaders #talent #HR #humanresources #retention #walkamile #employeeretention #talentmanagement #outplacement #careertransition #workforcemanagement #RIF #downsizing

Outplacement services as part of the organizational design process.

What Does A Change in Organization Design Mean for Employees?

Growth is a primary concern for the owner of every organization. Without growth and flexibility as part of its strategy, most organizations will not be able to keep up with market changes.

Even though nearly every organization focuses on growth in one way or another, many business owners and strategists don’t know where to draw the staffing vs. growth line. In an attempt to grow, many organizations expand to the point that it becomes difficult to manage all their operations and employees effectively.

And that’s where good organizational design comes into play.

While growth is important, all of your growth oriented efforts could go down the drain if you’re not smart about your organizational design. Growth, without a proper design and plan in place, increases organizational stress and makes your organization less efficient.

Growth is a primary concern for the owner of every organization. Without growth and flexibility as part of its strategy, most organizations will not be able to keep up with market changes, resulting in shorter- and longer-term business problems.

Even though nearly every organization focuses on growth in one way or another, it’s true that many business owners and strategists don’t know where to draw the staffing vs. growth line. In an attempt to grow, many organizations expand to the point that it becomes difficult to manage all their operations and employees effectively.

And that’s where good organizational design comes into play.

While growth is important, all of your growth oriented efforts could go down the drain if you’re not smart about your organizational design. Growth, without a proper design and plan in place, increases organizational stress and makes your organization less efficient.

What Does Organizational Design Mean for Employees?

A good design will help you improve communications, reduce unnecessary costs and improve your company’s profitability. Often, as a result of your design efforts, you will find out that you need less or different people to do the same or more work. Sometimes, as tough as it is, you need to let people go in order to keep your company strong.

This is a better way of while letting people go as part of the business growth process. By providing terminated employees with outplacement services, you maintain a strong reputation in your industry, with your customers and the employees who remain. Providing outplacement services to those in career transition is a tangible act of true corporate responsibly.

By hiring a Chicago, Dallas and central Illinois outplacement services company that provides career transition services throughout the United States, you can help your ex-employees find new jobs more quickly while doing the right thing as an organization.  By providing outplacement, you show your employees, including the ones that remain with you, that their contributions are valued and appreciated. This expression of corporate loyalty is noted and appreciated.

Seeking outplacement assistance will also help you maintain an employee-friendly reputation in the very tight labor market we find ourselves in today. On top of all this, knowing that you are going to help those leaving your organization by providing outplacement services will help you make the tough decision to terminate excess staff in a timely manner.

Interested in professional outplacement services? We can help!

With years of experience in the field, we at OutplacementCompany.net can help take the outplacement process off your plate, allowing you to focus on flexibility and growth.

Please get in touch today at rick@outplacementcompany.net to find out more about how we can help. We actually care about people in career transition and have a variety of high touch, humane, cost effective programs available to suit every budgetary need.

Gratitude

At this time of year, our thoughts turn to gratitude or thanks for all we have. Let’s face it, our worst day is still 100 percent better than the days of people in a large part of the world. We have roofs over our heads, are warm and dry, and are looking forward to a big meal with family and friends on Thursday. Those reading this obviously have some sort of technology and access to the internet, so that puts you even farther ahead!

I want to take a few minutes to talk about gratitude for your job. If you are employed, you should be grateful. If you have a job you love, you should be even more grateful. There is nothing better than looking forward to going to work every morning, feeling that you are fulfilled, happy and making a difference. If you have a great team and fabulous coworkers, even better. You must be truly thankful if you have great people to work with at a job you love.

What about those who don’t have a job? A large part of my business is career transition and outplacement, helping those who have been separated from their jobs find new ones. It’s hard to be grateful when you have been laid off or fired, especially this time of year. The excitement and joy of the holidays is difficult to enjoy when you worry about making a living. However, there is a silver lining and a few things to remember.

  • This won’t last forever. You WILL get another job. Maybe not today, or tomorrow, but it will happen. If you have an outplacement coach, it will probably happen sooner. You will survive, you have support, and be grateful that this too shall pass. Look forward.
  • You are very likely to get an even better job. Take a hard look at what you have now left behind. Was it perfect? Probably not. You have been given the gift of finding something better; a place that more closely matches your ideal. Be grateful for that gift.
  • You will find your best friends and supporters. The people who truly care about you will do everything in their power to help you. Reach out and ask them. Accept their help with gratitude.

It’s very easy to forget how fortunate you are, even if you don’t have a job right this minute. If you have a warm place to live, food on the table, and someone who cares, you are one of the lucky ones. Be thankful for today, and have a wonderful Thanksgiving weekend.

Outplacement for the Older Worker

As companies ponder downsizing, they usually look toward reducing labor costs. This means the biggest salaries, which encompass the most experienced, longest tenured employees. You may believe someone with years of relevant experience and great job history would be able to easily find another job. That is rarely the case. In reality, experienced 50-plus workers have vastly more trouble finding a new place than a relatively inexperienced 30-year-old.

Hard business decisions must be made at times, and the reality is that salaries and benefits are the largest expense for any company. When downsizing must occur, that’s where it happens. Logically, the biggest expenses – the highest-paid employees – are first.

We always advocate for giving any separated employee outplacement and career transition assistance. In the case of older employees, career counseling and job search support is crucial for several reasons.

  • Like it or not, ageism is rampant in the business world. Companies use various methods such as graduation dates, years of tenure, or job history to piece together information to estimate an applicant’s age. They assume a person will require more money, a higher title, or will be unsatisfied in a lesser position than previously held, even before discussing these issues in an interview. In fact, many older workers have “been there, done that” and will be very happy, loyal and productive in a position for which an HR screener may decide they are “overqualified” without a conversation.
  • The longer a separated worker is unemployed, the more it costs you, and an older worker could be unemployed for much longer as a result of the factors listed above. Unemployment insurance is a significant cost to any business, and the more being paid out, the higher your costs. In addition, if the separated employee decides to bring legal action against you, your legal costs plus settlement costs can be very high. Those who are provided support are much less likely to bring legal action against a former employer.
  • The emotional cost to an older worker can be severe. This is a person who worked diligently and successfully for many years, had the respect of coworkers and supervisors, and is now separated from what may have been a very large part of his or her identity. He or she has been out of the job market for some time, and will need some kind of support to re-enter.

Many companies offering outplacement will offer only very limited support, such as resume review or coaching for 30 days. Any older, separated employee can tell you that is not enough! A job search for a person over 50 will take longer than 30 days, and that person will need encouragement and coaching during that time.

When making the tough decision to separate your older worker, remember the additional challenges he or she will face and offer an appropriate career transition program. It’s the right thing to do, for the worker and for your business.

Travel or Trouble? Career transition goes both ways

People leave jobs. Sometimes voluntarily, sometimes not. A career transition is always an emotional roller coaster, even if it is the employee’s idea to leave, but more so when the separation is involuntary or when the voluntary separation is a result of job dissatisfaction of some kind.

What happens during that emotional upheaval? An employee leaving voluntarily has some reason for doing so, and will likely share that information with friends, family and coworkers during the transition. A few of those reasons…

  • Better hours – spin that into “I had to work too many hours, I didn’t have flexibility, I couldn’t take off for my child’s school program, …”;
  • More money – the story is your company didn’t pay enough to meet needs;
  • More supportive environment – turns into “I never felt valued, my boss didn’t listen to me…”

Whatever the reasons they have, even employees leaving under their own power can cause bad PR among their friends and acquaintances. If that is the case, imagine what damage a fired or laid-off employee could do! Given the digital world we live in today, the bad news can spread from friends to acquaintances to friends of friends and beyond in the blink of an eye. Stories will be embellished, small incidents magnified, misunderstandings become truth. Trouble!

Be ready when you need to separate an employee with a good career transition coach or outplacement provider. An objective third party can help ease the transition pain and refocus the negative energy into something positive that will help them travel forward into a new position that will hopefully be THE job they were meant to have. Finding THE job will help fade the memories of the past and open new and exciting highways to the future, limiting the trouble that could be caused during the search.

The bottom line is that separated employees who have career coaching or outplacement assistance move on to the next opportunity faster and more positively than those who don’t. If you must separate from an employee, do it in the best way possible – help them travel, not trouble!

 

Taking the curve successfully; a new career awaits

You have just been told there will be layoffs, big ones. Probably you. That understandably strikes terror in most people’s hearts, and you start thinking about where you can get another job like the one you have now. After all, you have a set of skills that perfectly fits what you have been doing, so looking for something just like it seems logical.

Is that approach truly logical, or even realistic? If people with a strictly defined set of skills and abilities just like yours are being laid off, how likely is it that other jobs just like yours are out there waiting? Maybe it’s a great time to really examine your work, job satisfaction, and options for the future.

Many, many people get a job early on in their careers that isn’t exactly what they wanted, but it’s close enough and it works out fine. Another opportunity comes up, and it is even a bit farther from what you really wanted in the beginning, but it’s a next step up from the job you took, so it works out, too. A couple more promotions or job changes like that, and you can look back and see how far off course you have gotten from where you originally intended. Maybe that’s ok, too, for a while. Then, through no fault of your own, the layoff happens. Where do you go from here?

It isn’t unrealistic to go back to your original goal, get back on the road you started out to travel. I live near an old stretch of Route 66, the original “Mother Road” running from Chicago to Los Angeles. The old road has been replaced in places by a new road that runs pretty much parallel to the old original road. There is one spot, though, where the new road veers away from the old, in a place marked with a sign, “Dead Man’s Curve.” When the new road was built, it was moved so that the old and obviously dangerous curve was bypassed, and the road straightened out. That curve is not unlike the curves we all take in our career path. Losing a job may mean you have the opportunity to straighten out the curves and get back on the road you began.

Straightening out that road may take some research, extra work, education, and determination. If the original career goal you had is still something you want and are willing to work for, now can be an ideal time. To make those first steps easier, an experienced career coach can help you decide what you really want and the best way to get there. Especially if you have been in the same job for a while, you will need help to find out what the next steps should be, how to prepare, and how to land in the place you want to be.

Don’t go alone around that curve, get the help you need from a coach to navigate it successfully into a new, better career.

A Journey of 1000 Miles

A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. So said the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu in the fourth century BC. Wise words then, and they still apply today for anyone embarking on a new venture.
In my practice, I talk with a lot of people in career transition. Some of those transitions are by choice, but most are not. It’s an unfortunate fact of modern life that as business needs change, so do the staffing needs. The days of working for the same company your entire life have come to an end, and most of us will go through some changes during our career. That means we will all start new journeys, perhaps several times.
Taking that first step on a new journey can be very hard. What step to take? What direction? How fast do I have to move? If you are in that position for the first time, it’s really hard to take that first step. Even if its not the first time, it’s still really hard to start! Every journey looks different, starts in a different place and has a different destination – which may not be at all obvious as you begin.
It helps to have a guide; a Sherpa, so to speak. You need someone who will not judge, criticize, or let you dwell in the past. A career counselor or an outplacement provider can help you take that first step with purpose and direction, and start you on that journey to the next destination. They can help you make sure your goal is the best possible fit for you, and provide encouragement along the way.
If you need help with that first step, don’t wait to find your Sherpa to help you start that journey in a positive, purposeful way.

Helping Them IN – Better career transition

In the world of career transition, practitioners often focus heavily on the “out” in outplacement. I even find myself locked in that mindset from time to time – helping people transition “out” of a job – because leaving a job is where I connect with someone in a career transition.

The “out” may not be the best way to think about a career transition. Job loss may be painful and feel like the end, like it really is “out” with no way back in. I think we should look at it from a different perspective; a career transition is a beginning of something else, we just need to discover what that is. Career transition can be “in” as well as “out.”

All the wisdom of the world can be found in the words of Mr. Rogers, even for those in transition.

“Often when you think you’re at the end of something, you’re at the beginning of something else.” ― Fred Rogers

Isn’t that a much better way to think of what happened? You aren’t going out a door with nothing in sight. You are opening a door and seeing a wide horizon and vast possibility.
I would be the first to tell you that is easy to say and harder to really believe. Losing a job, when the termination was out of your control and had nothing to do with your performance, loyalty, or skills, can be very hard. Right here in the city in which I live, a major employer is reducing its workforce dramatically and the reductions have little to do with job performance, only numbers. Many, many people have found themselves without work after years with the company.

With a good career coach or outplacement counselor, a person who finds himself in this position can shorten the time living with shock, disbelief and sadness and grab that door handle to open a new world of possibilities. He or she may need coaching and support, but look what lies ahead! This could be the opportunity to make a complete career change, to try something never attempted, to follow a long-held dream.

My goal for my outplacement clients is not to provide “out” placement, but turn that into “in” placement – a new and better beginning for their careers.